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For Parents

Are you ready for your child to attend college? Here you’ll find some resources to ensure you and your child are ready!


To help you understand your child's PSAT score report and how to interpret his or her PSAT results, view:


MCAS Testing Information

MCAS testing for 10th graders:

  • Semester 1 Biology - February 5-6, 2018
  • ELA - March 27-29, 2018
  • Math - May 23-24, 2018
  • Semester 2 Biology - June 6-7, 2018

It is very important that students be well rested, eat a good breakfast, attend on testing days, and arrive to school on time. Thank you for your support and cooperation.


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Guidance & Counseling

Our goal at Turners Falls High School is not to simply graduate students but to truly prepare them for life beyond high school. Whether they choose to enter the workforce, go to a community college, or attend a four-year university, we walk them through the process every step of the way. Starting with his or her first day of high school until graduation day, our guidance staff works tirelessly to ensure that every child meets or exceeds his or her potential.


School Counseling Mission Statement: Great Falls Middle School and Turners Falls High School

The school counseling program’s shared mission is to deliver a comprehensive program to all students that promotes lifelong learning and active citizenship for grades six through twelve. In partnership with the school and greater community, we provide a safe and supportive environment for students to discover their interests, pursue their goals, succeed academically, explore postsecondary options, and develop and improve their interpersonal and workplace readiness skills.


Our Vision

Empowering all students to be college and career ready.


Our Beliefs

We in the guidance department believe that:

  • All students are unique individuals with unique needs
  • All students have the capacity to achieve
  • All students need 21st century skills
  • All students have dignity and intrinsic value
  • Learning involves the education of the whole person and is a life-long process
  • All students should have access to a comprehensive school counseling program delivered by state-certified, master’s degree level counselors

The school counselor should:

  • Advocate for all students and be student-centered
  • Adhere to the ethical standards set forth by the American School Counselor Association
  • Be proactive and data driven
  • Draw upon the knowledge of and collaborate with family, school, and community partners
  • Utilize a team approach for planning and management purposes
  • Use technology to enhance program delivery
  • Participate regularly in professional development activities to remain up to date on best practices

 


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News
Sleep Deprivation and Today's Students

Life is full of distractions. Whether it is just a busy schedule or extracurricular activities, electronics, family time, or even a favorite television show, these activities can keep students from getting the rest they need to be successful at school. Sleep deprivation is a serious yet often overlooked problem for today’s students. By following a few simple suggestions, parents can help their children get the sleep they need to be successful students.

Beginning at an early age, parents can help their child create healthy sleeping habits and routines that will continue throughout his/her lifetime. Making sure that a child has a consistent sleep schedule is extremely important. A child’s bedtime and wake up time should be around the same time whether or not it is a school night. Having a consistent wake up time allows the body to build up adequate sleep pressure by the evening to help a child fall asleep quickly and at an appropriate time at night.

Another way to create a healthy sleeping habit is to create an atmosphere conducive to sleeping. A child’s bedroom should be a place of relaxation and quiet. His or her bedroom should also be a place of positive feelings. It is strongly encouraged not to use the bedroom as a place of punishment or confinement but rather a place of encouragement, positive feelings, and security.  The child may need a small nightlight or even a blanket or a stuffed animal to give him/her that sense of security, but a television should never be in a child’s bedroom. Additionally, the use of such simple elements as color choices, the temperature, or comfortable bedding can create a relaxing atmosphere.

There are several signs that children may exhibit if they are not getting an efficient amount of sleep. Parents need to be aware of their child’s mood; sleep deprivation can cause a child to be irritable, moody, and even cranky. Because the child is not getting enough sleep, he or she may not be able to control his/her mood, leading to frustration or becoming upset more quickly and easily. Other behavior, such as noncompliance and hyperactivity may also be an indicator of sleep deprivation. Not only will a child’s mood and behavior be affected by inefficient sleep, but his cognitive ability will also be affected. A child who is sleep deprived will have increased difficulty with his attention, memory, and creativity; all of which are important aspects of being successful at school.

Being a child is truly a fun and exciting time; it is also a time of learning and creating life-long habits. Parents have the ability to help their child develop healthy sleeping habits that will aid them during their school and professional careers. By being aware of their child’s sleeping atmosphere and the behaviors their child is exhibiting, parents can help their children avoid sleep deprivation and be successful students.

Online Resources

American Academy of Sleep Medicine
 (http://www.aasmnet.org/learningcenter/home.aspx)

“Children and Sleep”
(http://www.sleepfoundation.org/article/sleep-topics/children-and-sleep)

 “Healthy Sleep Habits for Children”
 (https://my.clevelandclinic.org/health/articles/14306-healthy-sleep-habits-for-children_ for_children.aspx)

“Sleep Deprivation Negatively Affects School Age Children”
(http://www.news-medical.net/news/20110810/Sleep-deprivation-negatively-affects-school-age-children.aspx)

 “Sleep in School-Aged Children (6-12 Years)”
(http://www.nationwidechildrens.org/sleep-in-school-aged-children)